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Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of late Saxon town of Thetford found in the catalog.

late Saxon town of Thetford

Stephen Dunmore

late Saxon town of Thetford

an archaeological and historical survey

by Stephen Dunmore

  • 346 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Norfolk Archaeological Unit in Dereham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Stephen Dunmore with Robert Carr.
SeriesEast Anglian archaeology -- 4
ContributionsCarr, Robert D., Norfolk Archaeological Unit.
The Physical Object
Pagination21p. ;
Number of Pages21
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19744466M

At Lyng associated finds include medieval pottery, a late Saxon pin and sceatta (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. , 87). The priory was established on marshy ground. Its precinct was defined by the town walls to the north-west and the river to the south-east. There are indications of a fishpond to. Skeyton is a small village and civil parish in the English county of village and parish of Skeyton had in the census a population of , increasing slightly to at the census. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North n lies 4 miles ( km) east of the market town of Aylsham, miles ( km) OS grid reference: TG

From inside the book. What Full view - Norfolk Archaeology, Volume 7 Full view - Norfolk Archaeology, Volume 15 Godwick Guestwick hexagonally faceted conical Hobart Iron Age James Corbridge John John Money King's Lynn Landscape Archaeology Late Saxon medieval Middle Saxon NAU Archaeology Report Neolithic Newcastle Norfolk.   The excavation results have added significantly to our understanding of Late Saxon Thetford, and confirmed that there was no earlier settlement in this part of the town. That the success of Thetford as a large and influential town was fairly short-lived was reflected in the relatively brief main span of activity, which was mostly concentrated Author: Heather Wallis.

Norfolk / ˈ n ɔːr f ə k / is a rural county in the East of dge of prehistoric Norfolk is limited by a lack of evidence — although the earliest finds are from the end of the Lower Paleolithic period. Communities have existed in Norfolk since the last Ice Age and tools, coins and hoards such as those found at Snettisham indicate the presence of an extensive and . Thetford is a market town and civil parish in the Breckland district of Norfolk, England. It is on the A11 road between Norwich and London, just east of Thetford Forest. The civil parish, covering an area of km2 ( sq mi), has a population of 24, Thetford - .


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Late Saxon town of Thetford by Stephen Dunmore Download PDF EPUB FB2

Overview. During the eleventh and twelfth centuries the town of Thetford itself faced a period of economic decline after late Saxon town of Thetford book Late Saxon heyday. However, the conquest of and the Norman dynasty founded by William the Conqueror had an important impact in Thetford; the town’s largest and most impressive medieval sites were created by the Normans.

Thetford Castle is a medieval motte and bailey castle in the market town of Thetford in the Breckland area of Norfolk, first castle in Thetford, a probable 11th century Norman ringwork called Red Castle, was replaced in the 12th century by a much larger motte and bailey castle on the other side of the town.

This new castle was largely destroyed in by Henry II, Coordinates: 52°24′40″N 0°45′17″E / °N. : Excavations at Mill Lane, Thetford, (): Heather Wallis: Books. Skip to main content. Try Prime Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account & Lists Orders Try Prime Cart. Books.

Go Search Today's Deals Best Sellers Find a Gift Customer Service New. There are believed to be around lost settlements in Norfolk, England. This includes places which have been abandoned as settlements due to a range of reasons and at different dates.

Types of lost settlement include deserted medieval villages (DMVs), relocated or "shrunken" villages, those lost to coastal erosion and other settlements known to have been "lost" or.‘ The Late Saxon Town of Thetford: an Interim Report on the –6 Excavations ’, MA 11 (), – 83 The economic factors affecting town growth have recently been extensively surveyed in Hodges, R., Dark Age Economics (London, ).Cited by: 8.

Buy The late Saxon Town of Thetford: an interim report on the excavations. by Davison, Brian K. (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low Author: Brian K. Davison. The history of the town of Thetford, in the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, from the earliest accounts to the present time Thomas Martin, Richard Gough J.

Nichols, - Thetford (England) - pages. Little Thetford means little public or people's ford—Old English lȳtel Thiutforda (c. ) and Liteltedford [] ()—compare with Thetford, Norfolk—Old English Thēodford (late 9th century) and Tedfort ().

The online Domesday Book records the settlement under the name Liteltetford []. The first written evidence that Ely Abbey had inherited the Little Thetford lands Country: England. Archaeological evidence suggests that Thetford was an important tribal centre during the late Iron Age and early Roman period.

A ceremonial 'grove' was uncovered there during excavations. In the Anglo-Saxon period, Thetford was the home of the monarchs of. Thetford, an important crossing of the Little Ouse River, draws its name from the Anglo-Saxon Theodford or peoples ford.

The nearby River Thet was later named after the town. In the Anglo-Saxon period, Thetford was the home of the monarchs of East Anglia and was seat of a ng code: Christmas is, after all, an Anglo-Saxon word – Cristesmæsse, a word first recorded in – and so would there be any resemblance to Christmas in.

The surprising results of my investigation are presented below. Madonna and Child, Book of Kells, Folio 7v – 8th century. Image: Wikipedia. The Domesday Book lists William of Bello Fargo as the Bishop of Thetford in Castle Hill, to the south-east of the town centre, is a Norman motte though no trace remains of the castle which once surmounted it.

The mound (motte) is open to the public, and provides excellent views of the town from its summit and extensive grid reference: TL Summary. This large site is located within the area of the Late Saxon town at Thetford. Excavations in and identified a Late Saxon road (NHER ) which runs across the north-eastern edge of the area as well as the remains of several Late Saxon buildings and pits adjacent to the road and several from these features have been dated to.

Thetford-type Ware. Site: Dragon Hall, Norwich. Period: Late Saxon (10thth centuries AD). Excavator: Norfolk Archaeological Unit. Published: forthcoming. Brief description: Thetford-type ware is so-called because kilns for the manufacture of this Late Saxon wheelmade pottery were first uncovered in Thetford.

However, it is likely that the ware developed in Ipswich, where kilns. In the late Saxon phase the economies of town and country developed a closer, direct interaction made possible by the re-introduction of a market-based economy, and the royal drive to Author: Matilda Holmes.

The Town Bank lies on the line of the known Late Saxon defences around the town on the south side of the river and was thought possibly to preserve part of its fabric and structure. Excavation revealed that the upstanding bank in the stretch within the school grounds (where it is at its highest) may be of much later date than supposed, with.

Thetford is a market town and civil parish in the Breckland district of Norfolk, England. It is on the A11 road between Norwich and London, just south of the Thetford Forest. The civil parish, covering an area of km2 ( sq mi), had a population of 24, in the UK d in: Norfolk, England ( -).

Thetford was an important tribal centre for the Iceni during the late Iron Age and early Roman period, with Castle Hill and Gallows Hill being sites of particular note.

During the Saxon period it was the principal centre of the eastern Heptarchy and a regular battle site between locals and the Viking invaders.

The nearby River Thet was later named after the town. In the Anglo-Saxon period, Thetford was the home of the monarchs of East Anglia [citation needed] and was seat of a bishopric. [citation needed] The Domesday Book lists William of Bello Fargo as the Bishop of Thetford [2] in The late Saxon town of Thetford was first mentioned in when the Vikings set up camp there.

It subsequently became an important Anglo-Danish settlement with records of a mint existing between and Excavations have revealed intensive occupation and industrial activity including ditches, pits, and pottery kilns.

The third, Thetford, covered about acres by the late eleventh century. The extent of tenth-century settlement and the date of its defences are still not known; Dunmore, S. and Carr, R., ‘ The Late Saxon Town of Thetford ’, East Anglian Archaeology 4 (), 1 – Cited by: 9.Rome2rio makes travelling from Thetford Forest to West Stow Anglo-Saxon Village easy.

Rome2rio is a door-to-door travel information and booking engine, helping you get to and from any location in the world.

Find all the transport options for your trip from Thetford Forest to West Stow Anglo-Saxon Village right here.Part 1 - The Basic Mythology: ‘Saxon’ – ‘King’ – ‘Martyr’ – ‘Patron saint of East Anglia’ – ‘First patron saint of England’.

All of these epithets can be applied to Edmund (or Eadmund), but for someone whose holy memory and cult of worship grew to enormous proportions in the early Middle Ages, very little.